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Korean Journal of Fertility and Sterility 2007;34(1):41-48.
Published online March 1, 2007.
Effects of Y Chromosome Microdeletion on the Outcome of in vitro Fertilization.
Noh Mi Choi, Kwang Moon Yang, Inn Soo Kang, Ju Tae Seo, In Ok Song, Chan Woo Park, Hyoung Song Lee, Hyun Joo Lee, Ka young Ahn, Ho Suap Hahn, Hee Jung Lee, Na Young Kim, Seung Youn Yu
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cheil General Hospital, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2Department of Urology, Cheil General Hospital, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
3Laboratory of Reproductive Biology & Infertility, Cheil General Hospital, Kwandong University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE
To determine whether the presence of Y-chromosome microdeletion affects the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) program. METHODS: Fourteen couples with microdeletion in azoospermic factor (AZF)c region who attempted IVF/ICSI or cryopreserved and thawed embryo transfer cycles were enrolled. All of the men showed severe oligoasthenoteratoazoospermia (OATS) or azoospermia. As a control, 12 couples with OATS or azoospermia and having normal Y-chromosome were included. Both groups were divided into two subgroups by sperm source used in ICSI such as those who underwent testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and those used ejaculate sperm. We retrospectively analyzed our database in respect to the IVF outcomes. The outcome measures were mean number of good quality embryos, fertilization rates, implantation rates, beta-hCG positive rates, early pregnancy loss and live birth rates. RESULTS: Mean number of good quality embryos, implantation rates, beta-hCG positive rates, early pregnancy loss rates and live birth rates were not significantly different between Y-chromosome microdeletion and control groups. But, fertilization rates in the Y-chromosome microdeletion group (61.1%) was significantly lower than that of control group (79.8%, p=0.003). Also, the subgroup underwent TESE and having AZFc microdeletion showed significantly lower fertilization rates (52.9%) than the subgroup underwent TESE and having normal Y-chromosome (79.5%, p=0.008). Otherwise, in the subgroups used ejaculate sperm, fertilization rates were showed tendency toward lower in couples having Y-chromosome microdeletion than couples with normal Y-chromosome. (65.5% versus 79.9%, p=0.082). But, there was no significance statistically. CONCLUSIONS: In IVF/ICSI cycles using TESE sperm, presence of Y-chromosome microdeletion may adversely affect to fertilization ability of injected sperm. But, in cases of ejaculate sperm available for ICSI, IVF outcome was not affected by presence of Y-chromosome AZFc microdeletion. However, more larger scaled prospective study was needed to support our results.
Key Words: Azoospermia; OATS; Y-chromosome microdeletion; ICSI; TESE


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